South Jersey Alice Paul NOW

                                                                           

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Save the date! Chapter Fundraiser at Bob Evans in Mount Laurel
February 24, 2015, 7:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m.

 

Please join us on Tuesday, February 24, 2015, at Bob Evans at 601 Fellowship Rd in Mount Laurel,
NJ, 856-231-9125, for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or carry-out. South Jersey NOW–Alice Paul Chapter
will receive 15% of the food proceeds.

Download the voucher to bring with you to give to your server.

If you have any questions, or want to add your e-mail address to our database, please call or
email Norma Blake at 609-923-2164 or neblake123@comcast.net.

Remember to bring your voucher on February 24 and enjoy a great meal!


MONTHLY PROGRAM MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT  

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

7:30 PM


Meeting location:
First Baptist Church, 19 West Main Street, Moorestown, NJ
The church is across from TD Bank; please use the side entrance of the church, nearest to Carl's Shoes.
Please park in the municipal lot behind the shoestore and the shopping center.

 

Program Topic/Speaker:

Civil Rights, Then and Now: 50 Years Later
the Struggle for Racial Justice Continues

 

Combatting Racism is one of NOW’s six main goals. As part of our celebration of Black History Month, we are honored to have as our speaker Rev. Julia Chaney-Moss, whose brother James Earl Chaney and two other civil rights workers, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, all in their early 20s, were murdered by the KKK in Meridian, Mississippi on the first day of a summer-long crusade to register voters. During Freedom Summer 1964, 900 volunteers including many black and white college students joined the push to enable African-Americans to vote. That effort was met with violence, resulting in arrests, beatings and church bombings.

In 2014, President Obama awarded a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom to Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner as “unsung heroes who sacrificed their lives in the fight for freedom, justice and equality”.

Julia Chaney-Moss, fourth of five children born to Fannie L. Roberts and Ben Amos Chaney, Sr. grew up in a family intimately involved in the civil rights movement of the 1960s. When James was 15, he and two young members of the local NAACP, were suspended from a segregated school for wearing, and refusing to remove, a paper NAACP “button”. At the age of 19, James participated in the Freedom Bus Rides and also took his younger brother Ben with him to work in Michael Schwerner’s CORE activities.

After James’ murder, his mother was not able to obtain work and, to ensure Ben’s safety, had to escort him to and from school. Following a series of threats, Fannie and her children relocated to New York in 1965 so she could find work and Ben could safely attend school. For several years, Ms. Chaney-Moss worked at, and attended, New York University before beginning her “life’s work” — a ministry in Human Services. In 1992, she was ordained an Interfaith Minister of Spiritual Healing and spent 50 years in the human service field, the last 30 in numerous positions at the New York Foundling (NYF).

Ms. Chaney-Moss is a sought-after motivational speaker and was keynote speaker at the Church Women United event honoring Dr. King in the Chapel at the United Nations. She has also lectured at Long Island University’s Brooklyn and Westchester campuses, the City College of New York, and local New York City School district offices on child abuse. In addition, Ms. Chaney-Moss is a spiritual life coach supporting major life transformations. From 1998-2009, during International Women’s Month (March), she facilitated “A Grand Gathering of Sisters”, a program she created to offer spiritual healing and empowerment to women.

At our Program Meeting, Ms. Chaney-Moss (who is going to be a member of South Jersey NOW) will discuss how race and racism continue to play a role in American society and the ways in which America has, and has not, moved forward since 1964. After making a short presentation, she has asked that the evening be an interactive one. Please bring at least one question with you and jot down others as you hear her speak. We hope that you will join us for this very powerful, riveting and inspiring evening.


Meetings include speaker, refreshments, announcments and letter-writing activity.
Meetings open to members and nonmembers.



HOW CAN I MAKE A DIFFERENCE WITH SOUTH JERSEY NOW TODAY?


BECOME A MEMBER!
See membership forms link at left, sliding scale available.

MAKE A DONATION!
To donate via mail, please send a check made payable to:
SJ NOW-Alice Paul Chapter, PO Box 2801, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034

To donate via PayPal, click here:


VOLUNTEER TO ESCORT at a local women's center!
Contact the chapter email or call the chapter phone at 856-778-8320.

CHECK OUT THE CALENDAR OF EVENTS!
See link at left.

SHOP ONLINE WITH THE IGIVE.COM shopping window!
Support SJ NOW by purchasing items you normally buy online.
For more details on how to become an iGive.com user, see below.

 

IGIVE.COM

 

Do you love to shop on the internet? Here's how you can help the chapter every time you buy online:

Use our chapter joinlink to sign up for iGive.com. SJ NOW Join Link

 

Then download the iGive.com shopping window Shopping Window Download and percentages of your
purchases will automatically go to the chapter every time you shop online! No need to login to a website or
fuss around with passwords. The shopping window will automatically pop up when you enter an online store
and your purchases will be recorded! Barnes & Noble, LandsEnd and 1800Flowers, are just a few examples
of the participating online stores. See a list of the many online participating stores here: Merchant List

Note, you must register with iGive.com first for the shopping window link above to work. To access the shopping
window download through the iGive website, first register, then click on the "shopping" link in the left-hand column,
and then click on "shop through the iGive.com shopping window" and you'll be directed to the download. iGive.com
is compatible with most browsers and operating systems.



I always feel the movement is a sort of mosaic.
Each of us puts in one little stone,
and then you get a great mosaic at the end.


—Alice Paul, American Heritage (11/93)